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Camdeboo National Park

Camdeboo National Park

     
 

Phone:

+27 (0) 49 892 3453

Email:

camdeboo@sanparks.org

Website:

www.sanparks.org/parks/camdeboo/

Poaching Hotline:

+27 (0) 800 205 005

 
     

Size:  19,405 ha / 194.05 km2

Nearest major city:  Port Elizabeth (3h approx by car)

Species Numbers:  43 Mammals        209 Birds        34 Reptiles

Big Five:  No

Highlights:

  • - Malaria-free
  • - Easy day trip from the historical town of Graff-Reinet
  • - Spectacular scenery

Camdeboo National Park, whose name could mean “green valley” or “green pool” in Khoekhoen,is the smallest national park in the country and surrounds the town of Graaff-Reinet in the arid Karoo of the Eastern Cape. Despite its size and location within a habitat zone apparently devoid of life, Camdeboo is blessed with some dramatic scenery and a fair amount of wildlife, which is easy to spot because of the open landscapes unhindered by bush.

Historically, too, the area is rich in both ancient and modern eras. Like the Karoo National Park, Camdeboo is a fossil hunter’s paradise, with evidence of life from 250 million years ago. And the juxtaposition of a national park and the pretty little town of Graaff-Reinet, with its white-washed Cape Dutch style homesteads, makes for interesting travel. Indeed, according to park manager records, a wandering male kudu once found its way down main street, walked up two flights of stairs of an office building, startling the attendant receptionist, who telephoned the park rangers to ask if they could come collect their animal, which they duly did with considerable effort, no doubt to the bewilderment and amusement of the town’s residents.